Thursday, 19 October 2017

Charity shop to be given new look

THE Cancer Research shop in Henley is being refurbished after proving to be one of the charity’s best- performing shops

THE Cancer Research shop in Henley is being refurbished after proving to be one of the charity’s best- performing shops in the Thames Valley.

The Duke Street store came second in a list of shops based on income. The top shop was in Beaconsfield.

The shop has been closed since Sunday for its makeover and will re-open on Wednesday with a new logo.

Kate Martin, the charity’s area release manager, who is based in Henley, said: “It’s nice to have been recognised and to be able to lead the brand. You are always a bit worried to price things too highly, especially in charity shops. There’s a fear you will price yourself out of the market but we seem to be able to get it right.”

She said the secret to the shop’s success was the quality of its goods. Recent items sold included a Mulberry handbag for £100, an Armani coat for £60 and a Pandora bracelet for £50.

She said: “We have many loyal donors and get a lot of stock through the door. There’s really good brand awareness and people relate to us more than other charities because lots of people are affected by cancer. In Henley especially I feel a lot of the customers relate to that.

“We’ve found it slightly more difficult because of the recession but we’ve benefited from some really good quality donations. We get a lot of designer brands and people are willing to pay higher prices for them.”

The shop will have new flooring, a kitchen area, office and seating space for its workforce of more than 25 volunteers. It is also being repainted.

It will have a new layout and the one small pen for donated stock will be replaced by two larger ones.

Ms Martin said: “We also have a new till area and the shop will be more advanced. It’s about keeping up with everyone else because we were looking a bit drab compared with other shops. With Henley being an affluent area, we have to have a good face.

“Having two massive pens means we can hold more donations. Sometimes we have to send stock on to another shop, which is annoying. Now if another shop has too much stock it can be sent to us because we have the capacity. We will have better things to sell.”

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