Thursday, 21 June 2018

At the Regal Picturehouse this week

Discover Tuesdays: Like Father Like Son (PG)

Discover Tuesdays: Like Father Like Son (PG)

Starring: Masaharu Fukuyama, Machiko Ono, Yôko Maki

Another poetic work from art-house director Koreeda (Still Walking). The story follows a wealth businessman who disovers that his son was switched at birth.

Winner of the Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival this year. Explores the themes of fatherhood, loyalty and family dynamics.

Gravity(12A)

Starring: Judi Dench, Steve Coogan

Coogan takes on a serious role as journalist Martin Sixsmith who accompanies an Irish pensioner in search of the toddler taken away from her by Catholic nuns. Based on a true story.



The usually rather silly Coogan is surprisingly good in this role. It’s a serious and somewhat depressing subject matter, but glimmers of his innate wit, combined with Dench’s superlative acting, make this an uplifting film.

The Butler (12A)

Starring: Forest Whitaker, Oprah Winfrey, Mariah Carey, John Cusack

Forest Whitaker plays White House butler Cecil Gaines who served eight presidential administrations, and Winfrey plays his wife. Based on a true story.

Lee Daniels’ film obviously deals with the delicate issue of race relations and the subservience of the old school butler, as compared to his hot-headed, Black Panther son.

Philomena (12A)



Starring: George Clooney, Sandra Bullock

Rookie astronaut Dr Ryan Stone (Bullock) is cut loose and rocketing through space after an accident at a space station. Matt Kowalski (Clooney) talks her through the rescue attempt.

Said to be the most riveting, realistic and scary sci-fi movie for years. The CGI effects shot at Pinewood Studios are second-to-none.



Kids Club: The Jungle Book (U)

Voices of: Phil Harris, Sebastian Cabot, Louis Prima

Boy raised by wolves in the Indian jungle finds trouble re-integrating into human society. Based on a story by Rudyard Kipling.

Funny, entertaining, heart-warming and with a fabulous, toe-tapping musical score. If you have a grandchild, here’s your chance to indulge in a bit of nostalgia, all in the name of “helping out”.

The movie begins as Katniss Everdeen has returned home safe after winning the 74th annual Hunger Games along with fellow tribute Peeta Mellark. Winning means that they must turn around and leave their family and close friends, embarking on a “Victor’s Tour” of the districts. Along the way Katniss senses that a rebellion is simmering, but the Capitol is still very much in control as President Snow prepares the 75th Annual Hunger Games (The Quarter Quell) - a competition that could change Panem forever.





Second-act problems plague “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” but that’s what happens when the entire movie is a second act.



By definition, this sequel can’t feel as fresh as the first movie, “The Hunger Games,” and it’s prevented from delivering whatever rock ‘em, sock ‘em moments are being saved for next year’s finale. It spins its wheels while giving us the illusion of movement. It succeeds, just barely, and mostly thanks to another tough performance from Jennifer Lawrence, returning as the reluctant warrior-hero Katniss Everdeen.



The rules of this movie’s fanciful world -- a tyrannical regime whose annual Hunger Games force children to kill each other -- have already been established, which means “Catching Fire” can immediately start adding wrinkles. Still, new director Francis Lawrence (“I Am Legend”) takes his time doing so. The first hour sets up a convoluted plot, in which Katniss’ popular support begins to concern the sinister President Snow (Donald Sutherland). As a result, Katniss and co-survivor Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson, vague but improving) are drafted into another competition, the Quarter Quell. Their competitors will be past champions like the cocky Finnick Odair (a charming Sam Claflin), brainy Beetee (Jeffrey Wright) and oversexed Johanna Mason (Jena Malone). All these colorful characters, including new Gamemaker Plutarch Heavensbee (a slippery Philip Seymour Hoffman), help hold our interest during the slow moments.



Katniss Everdeen has returned home safe after winning the 74th Annual Hunger Games along with fellow tribute Peeta Mellark. Winning means that they must turn around and leave their family and close friends, embarking on a “Victor’s Tour” of the districts. Along the way Katniss senses that a rebellion is simmering, but the Capitol is still very much in control as President Snow prepares the 75th Annual Hunger Games (The Quarter Quell) - a competition that could change Panem forever.





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