Tuesday, 18 September 2018

Every dog can be taught to behave, says trainer

ABOUT 30 people took their pets to a dog behaviour session in Remenham.

ABOUT 30 people took their pets to a dog behaviour session in Remenham.

Josh Wood, founder of the Instincts Group, ran a two-hour coaching session at Remenham Club, which is owned by his parents.

Demonstrations included how to train a dog so they can recognise a vacuum cleaner but not be affected by the noise and how to interact with other dogs.

Mr Wood, 23, of Vicarage Road, Henley, set up the business three years ago and taught himself by watching dog trainers on TV.

He said: “This is the first time I have worked in a public arena — usually I go to people’s homes.

“I have always loved dogs and as a child we had German pointers and Labradors. We had to rehome one of them when I was younger as it was not good with people.

“German pointers were the first type of dogs I trained when I started this and I actually worked with my dad as my first case.

“I have now helped hundreds of people and have been quite successful so I want to take it on to a bigger scale.”

He said there was no dog that couldn’t be trained, adding: “You can always help a dog to be more of a dog — we humanise them and take them away from being what they are and that’s a massive problem.

“Every dog has the opportunity to be better behaved and have a better life. If you don’t know how to speak to a dog you have to learn.

“They are really simple creatures and they are very honest. Understanding builds trust and trust earns respect, which is the key foundation of how I work with the dogs.

“I have worked with dogs from aggressive pit bulls to American bulldogs and that’s as hard as it gets. I love the job and want to help people when it gets really bad.” Claire Shankland, of Belle Vue Road, Henley, brought Sophie, a German short-haired pointer, to the session.

She said: “Josh has been helping us with Sophie as she has problems when other dogs come up very close. The session was very useful and Sophie was very relaxed.”

Liz Challis, from Watlington, took along her black Labrador Tom. She said: “I think it is great that so many people have brought their dogs and what Josh is doing is really good.”

For more information, www.theinstinctsgroup.com

“I have always loved dogs and as a child we had German pointers and Labradors. We had to rehome one of them when I was younger as it was not good with people.

“German pointers were the first type of dogs I trained when I started this and I actually worked with my dad as my first case.

“I have now helped hundreds of people and have been quite successful so I want to take it on to a bigger scale.”

He said there was no dog that couldn’t be trained, adding: “You can always help a dog to be more of a dog — we humanise them and take them away from being what they are and that’s a massive problem.

“Every dog has the opportunity to be better behaved and have a better life. If you don’t know how to speak to a dog you have to learn.

“They are really simple creatures and they are very honest. Understanding builds trust and trust earns respect, which is the key foundation of how I work with the dogs.

“I have worked with dogs from aggressive pit bulls to American bulldogs and that’s as hard as it gets. I love the job and want to help people when it gets really bad.” Claire Shankland, of Belle Vue Road, Henley, brought Sophie, a German short-haired pointer, to the session.

She said: “Josh has been helping us with Sophie as she has problems when other dogs come up very close. The session was very useful and Sophie was very relaxed.”

Liz Challis, from Watlington, took along her black Labrador Tom. She said: “I think it is great that so many people have brought their dogs and what Josh is doing is really good.”

For more information, www.theinstinctsgroup.com

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