Thursday, 20 September 2018

TV historian’s amusing anecdotes about ancestors

TELEVISION presenter and historian Dr Lucy Worsley drew a sell-out crowd when she gave a talk in Whitchurch.

TELEVISION presenter and historian Dr Lucy Worsley drew a sell-out crowd when she gave a talk in Whitchurch.

All 100 seats at the village hall were taken for the event, which was called An Intimate History Of Your Home.

Dr Worsley, who presents BBC4’s history show If Walls Could Talk, looked at how ordinary British people lived from the 15th century to the present day.

Her 90-minute presentation explored how bathrooms, bedrooms, living rooms and kitchens have changed over the centuries.

It also took a humorous look at old customs and traditions from different periods.

Hardwick Road resident Nick Brazil, who attended the event, said: “She revealed many fascinating details about our ancestors’ bathing and sleeping habits.

“These included the fact that Queen Elizabeth actually possessed a flushing toilet and that unmarried couples could sleep together in their parents’ bed to get to know each other better.

“The only snag here was that they were tied down and separated by a wooden board.”

Afterwards, Dr Worsley answered questions from the audience and signed copies of her latest book, also called If Walls Could Talk.

She stayed behind for another hour to chat with guests as they enjoyed refreshments.

Last Friday’s event was jointly organised by the Whitchurch Society and the Whitchurch and Goring Heath History Society.

It raised £400, which will go towards the upkeep of the new village green in Eastfield Lane.

It came about because Dr Worsley’s father Prof Peter Worsley, who is professor emeritus of geology at the University of Reading, lives in Whitchurch.

Dr Worsley, 39, is also chief curator of Historic Royal Palaces, the charity which looks after Hampton Court Palace, Kew Palace and the Tower of London.

Ian Bruce, secretary of the Whitchurch Society, said: “It was very popular - we actually sold out two weeks before the event.

“As well as being interesting it was quite light-hearted and amusing. We learned a lot about how ordinary people lived.

“She was very good at meeting her audience and was a very personable young lady.”



ENDS



with sub pix - CREDIT TO NICK BRAZIL



“lucy worsley 1.jpg” shows Lucy chatting to villager Tanya Hawley



“lucy worsley 2.jpg” shows her chatting with assorted guests



“lucy worsley 3.jpg” shows (left to right) Vicky Jordan of the Whitchurch and Goring Heath History Society, Ian Bruce of the Whitchurch Society, Dr Lucy Worsley, Peter Smith of the Whitchurch Society.

TELEVISION presenter and historian Dr Lucy Worsley drew a sell-out crowd when she gave a talk in Whitchurch.

All 100 seats at the village hall were taken for the event, which was called An Intimate History Of Your Home.

Dr Worsley, who presents BBC 4’s history show If Walls Could Talk, talked about how British people have lived from the 15th century to the present day. Her 90-minute presentation explored how bathrooms, bedrooms, living rooms and kitchens have changed over the centuries. She also took a humorous look at old customs and traditions.

Nick Brazil, of Hardwick Road, said: “She revealed many fascinating details about our ancestors’ bathing and sleeping habits.

“These included the fact that Elizabeth I possessed a flushing toilet and that unmarried couples could sleep together in their parents’ bed to get to know each other better — the only snag was that they were tied down and separated by a wooden board.”

After her talk, Dr Worsley answered questions from the audience and signed copies of her latest book.

Friday’s event was jointly organised by the Whitchurch Society and the Whitchurch and Goring Heath History Society. It raised £400, which will go towards the upkeep of the new village green in Eastfield Lane.

Dr Worsley, 39, is also chief curator of Historic Royal Palaces, the charity which looks after Hampton Court Palace, Kew Palace and the Tower of London. Her father Peter is professor emeritus of geology at the University of Reading and lives in Whitchurch.

Ian Bruce, secretary of the Whitchurch Society, said the talk had sold out two weeks in advance and Dr Worsley lived up to expectations. “She was very good at meeting her audience and was a very personable young lady,” he said.

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