Monday, 21 August 2017

Stonor Park visitor centre and converted home plan

A visitor centre could be built at Stonor Park.

A visitor centre could be built at Stonor Park.

The Honourable William Stonor, son of Lord Camoys, has applied for planning permission to create the centre which would house and display an historic coach.

He also hopes to convert the Wool Loft, which is currently used for storage, into a three-bedroom house, where his parents would live when they retire.

The Honourable William Stonor and his family would then take up residence in the main house.

Lord Camoys said: “We have been here for over thirty years and we would like to transform that particular building and retire there.

“We are in our seventies and you need quite a lot of energy to run this place.”

Lord Camoys said creating the 180.6 m² rectangular visitor centre, which would include a kitchen, multi-purpose room, toilets and stores, was necessary.

“Most places which are open to the public normally have a vistor centre where they can explain to people what they are going to see,” he said.

“In many ways having those facilities available is a basic part of opening a house to the public and, as we have no space elsewhere, it needs to be created.”

The planning application states that the building has been designed to be a “balance of traditional and contemporary design” with red brick walls with burnt header, as well as some timber cladding.

The blue slate roof would incorporate rooflights and the building would also include glazing panels and a glass door.

Stone paving would provide a pathway to the main entrance and a loose gravel area would surround it.

A design and access letter supporting the application states that the centre will “boost the enjoyment of visitors to Stonor Park through creation of an improved visitor experience”. It also says that the centre is an “exciting and important part of the custodian family’s long term plans to sustain and enhance Stonor Park”.

The planning application also proposes to create a footpath to link the visitor centre to the main house, extend and re-align the car park and re-align the driveway to the car park.

Access to the car park would be widened for coach access and a grass overflow car park would be created to accommodate additional visitors at peak times.

Lord Camoys was granted planning permission to use The Wool Loft, a Grade II listed building, for commercial use last year, but now plans to convert it into a house.

Changes to the building to make it hospitable would include lowering window cills, and adding roof lights and chimneys.

A bat loft would be added to accommodate the nesting species.

Lord Camoys said: “It will be nice to be near the family and near the house where my wife has done so much.”

Lord Camoys was refused planning permission to demolish a ruined tower at Stonor Park and replace it with a house two years ago.

Pishill with Stonor parish council has recommended both planning applications for approval.

South Oxfordshire District Council is expected to make a decision on the application by December 3.



ends



NB Lord Camoys’ administrator is sending me a new photo of him should you wish to use one- apparently he doesn’t like the one we have on file.

A VISITOR centre could be built at Stonor Park.

The Hon William Stonor, son of Lord Camoys, has applied for planning permission to create the centre, which would house an historic coach for display.

He also hopes to convert the wool loft, which is currently used for storage, into a three-bedroom house where his parents would live while he and his family would take up residence in the main house.

Two years ago, Lord Camoys was refused planning permission to demolish a ruined tower at Stonor Park and replace it with a house.

Last year, he was granted planning permission to use the Grade II listed wool loft for commercial purposes. Lord Camoys said: “We have been here for over 30 years and would like to transform that particular building and retire there.

“We are in our seventies and you need quite a lot of energy to run this place. It will be nice to be near the family and near the house where my wife has done so much.”

To help make the loft house habitable the windowsills would be lowered and roof lights and chimneys added.

The 180.6m² rectangular visitor centre would include a kitchen, multi-purpose room, toilets and stores.

Lord Camoys said: “Most places which are open to the public normally have a visitor centre where they can explain to people what they are going to see.

“In many ways having those facilities available is a basic part of opening a house to the public and, as we have no space elsewhere, it needs to be created.”

The planning application states that the building has been designed to be a balance of the traditional and the contemporary with red brick walls and some timber cladding.

The blue slate roof would incorporate roof lights and the building would also have glazing panels and a glass door.

Stone paving would provide a pathway to the main entrance with a loose gravel area around it. There would also be a footpath from the visitor centre to the main house and the car park would be extended and the access widened for coaches.

A grass overflow car park would also be created for use at peak times.

A design and access letter supporting the application says the centre is an “exciting and important part of the custodian family’s long-term plans to sustain and enhance Stonor Park”.

Pishill with Stonor Parish Council has recommended that the planning applications are approved and South Oxfordshire District Council is due to make the final decision by December 3.

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