Saturday, 25 November 2017

Teenager tells MPs about 3D printing

A TEENAGER from Henley addressed more than 50 MPs and industry experts at the House of Commons on the value

A TEENAGER from Henley addressed more than 50 MPs and industry experts at the House of Commons on the value of 3D printing in education.

Adam Cookson, 13, of Vicarage Road, spoke to the select committee on children, schools and families after Gillotts School, where he is a pupil, was loaned a 3D printer for a year by the British Computing Society.

Adam told how crowdfunding could be used to fund 3D printing clubs outside school which could help young people to improve their skills in preparation for their careers.

Earlier this year, Adam and some fellow Gillotts students used the printer in a design project along with Sacred Heart and Badgemore primary schools in Henley.

The students took part in a national competition organised by the Design and Technology Association called the Great British Make Off, where children were challenged to design something which could help with cycling.



They created a device for bicycles which can control lights and mudguards and check the tyre pressure and has an inbuilt GPS system.

The team was highly commended by judges.

Adam, who was helped by friends Jonathan Abrahams and Syd Lambert, said: “The project was really fun and together we made something which I think was really good.I hope 3D printing continues to grow and this school can own its own printer one day.”

Adam, who was accompanied his technology teacher Frances Wakefield and Sacred Heart teacher Duncan Steele, was invited to the Commons by Royal Institution member Tim Hoskins after he had visited Gillotts School.

The teenager said: “It was an amazing experience and I really enjoyed it.

“A few of the audience came up and congratulated me on my speech afterwards and one even said I should become an MP!”

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