Wednesday, 21 February 2018

Ever thought of keeping a diary?

SEPTEMBER is a great time to reflect and make updates and changes to your diet and lifestyle.

SEPTEMBER is a great time to reflect and make updates and changes to your diet and lifestyle.

The end of the summer season gives us all a chance to plan for the next few months ahead. What workouts have you got lined up in the diary, have you joined any clubs — running, walking, cycling, swimming, hiking? What are your plans regarding your food/energy in and out? Does it all seem like a minefield?

There is a really easy way to look at your food intake and that is by doing a food diary.

Doing a food diary means you can analyse the carbohydrate, fat and protein content of your daily intake of food — or ask your gym/trainer to look at it for you.

Make sure you list all foods, times and when and where you ate. What cooking method was used — fried, grilled, boiled, baked or in the microwave? Did you add butter or oil during the food preparation process? Did you leave the skin on the meats you cooked?



SEPTEMBER is a great time to reflect and make updates and changes to your diet and lifestyle.

The end of the summer season gives us all a chance to plan for the next few months ahead. What workouts have you got lined up in the diary, have you joined any clubs — running, walking, cycling, swimming, hiking? What are your plans regarding your food/energy in and out? Does it all seem like a minefield?

There is a really easy way to look at your food intake and that is by doing a food diary.

Doing a food diary means you can analyse the carbohydrate, fat and protein content of your daily intake of food — or ask your gym/trainer to look at it for you.

Make sure you list all foods, times and when and where you ate. What cooking method was used — fried, grilled, boiled, baked or in the microwave? Did you add butter or oil during the food preparation process? Did you leave the skin on the meats you cooked?



Weigh your food and record. If food comes from a packet then record the weight from the label or use scales. If you can’t record weight, maybe compare the size of the food by teaspoon, tablespoon, a cup or a mug.

Did you have white or brown toast? Did you have spread or topping on your toast? If so, what type? How big was the salad you had? Did you have dressing on it? What made up your salad? Avocado, nuts, mozzarella, high fat salad dressing? List everything!

Other questions to ask yourself:

• What was the portion size? It may not be so easy to do this so use an average portion size taken from a food portion book.

• What drinks did you consume — including alcohol? Log what milk you used in tea and coffee (and how much) and did you add sugar?

• How did you feel when you ate? On a scale of one to 10 (one is full and 10 is ravenous). Did you eat because you were bored, hungry, stressed?

As someone once said: “To get a true food diary you need you to be honest and not underestimate your diary.”

Your food diary should include what you eat, why you are eating, when you ate and what you drank.

You need to discover what your habits are, whether you are eating because you are bored, the patterns and timings of meals, cooking techniques, food choices, alcohol intake, and influences on eating habits and portion sizes. The food diary should be done as and when you eat.

At the same time, list all the activity you have done during the day. Not necessarily exercise in particular but did you take the stairs at work? Did you walk or cycle to work? Did you walk out at lunchtime? If so, for how long?

Get to grips with your daily activity and make sure you balance your energy.

For further information please email nutritiousworks@gmail.com and I will do my best to advise you. Have a great day!

Emma-Jane Taylor - www.nutritiousworks.com



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