Monday, 20 November 2017

How green is our river

AFTER seeing this photograph, you could be forgiven for thinking the River Thames had suffered a radioactive spillage.

AFTER seeing this photograph, you could be forgiven for thinking the River Thames had suffered a radioactive spillage.

The eye-catching green hue was spotted by walker Lee Keates while taking a stroll in Mill Meadows in Henley with his father Melvin.

He said: “We had just gone past the River and Rowing Museum and it was in a stream just further on.

“Lots of people were standing there looking at the water and seemed shocked. We decided to have a closer look and noticed it was just starting to run into the main river.

“We thought it could be some sort of toxic pollution or chemical so we were quite worried. Because it’s green as well it just makes you think of pollution.



“We normally walk right to the end but after seeing that we decided to fast-track our walk and headed back to report it.” Mr Keates, from Reading, took some pictures before informing both the museum and Henley Town Council.

However, far from being nuclear waste or a particular luminous form of algae, it turned out the cause was a dye used to track water flow in the river — but no one knows who was responsible.

A spokesman for the Environment Agency,, which is responsible for the river, said: “We are aware of some dye tracing that has been done in the catchment which ultimately leads to the River Thames in Henley.

“The dye is commonly used to trace the flow of water from outfalls. It is inert and has no long-term impact on the environment.”



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