Thursday, 19 April 2018

Review: Lady Churchill one-woman monologue

THIS drama was in fact a monologue and Rohan McCullough gave a stunning performance as Lady Clementine, Winston Churchill’s devoted

THIS drama was in fact a monologue and Rohan McCullough gave a stunning performance as Lady Clementine, Winston Churchill’s devoted wife, in this moving and entertaining portrayal of their life together written by Hugh Whitemore.

Clemmie, as she was called by him, focuses on the extraordinary relationship that endured not only the immense pressure of Churchill’s rise to power and the fury of war, but also his single-mindedness and often near impossible behaviour.

I was totally enthralled, all the way through by this solo woman of indeterminate age and the grey dress which seemed to change style as she moved.

The curtain opened to reveal a severe-looking old lady who then spun round to reveal a beautiful young lady with a lovely smile, dreaming about “those pale blue eyes”. Winston’s eyes had captured her at their first meeting and it was love at first sight. What she did not know was that he felt the same.

A few years passed then, on their second meeting he proposed to her in the temple at Blenheim Palace.

Clemmie’s father had divorced her mother on the grounds that she had too many lovers. Her mother was consequently not very well off, but still managed to inveigle Clemmie into the fringes of high society.

Rohan read some of Clemmie’s letters to her husband, and it was clear that she advised him tactfully, lovingly and sensibly. She was a very loving and supportive wife, through all the ups and downs of his career.

To the audience, Rohan Mc Cullough WAS Clemmie. She changed her expressions and her stance all the time to match the story, and she held us all in her spell until the very end.

An outstanding evening.

My Darling Clemmie

Kenton Theatre

Saturday, October 12

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