Tuesday, 17 July 2018

The eyes still have it in this Jazz Age classic

THE Great Gatsby was brought to us by Blackeyed Theatre, who took us straight to the Roaring

THE Great Gatsby was brought to us by Blackeyed Theatre, who took us straight to the Roaring Twenties, with jazzy parties, snazzy guests and flapper chic in a well-designed and elegant stage set.

A talented ensemble played and interchanged a variety of musical instruments beautifully.

Narrator Nick Carraway is a neighbour of the wealthy, enigmatic and elusive Jay Gatsby, who throws lavish and extravagant parties.

He is revered by his party-goers and it is revealed that he is in love with the married Daisy Buchanan, whose unfaithful husband, Tom, often escapes to the city to spend time with his married mistress, Myrtle.

Gatsby is seen gazing at the green light of the dock near Daisy’s residence and the city is represented by a large pair of watchful eyes — both symbols created with fantastic yet simple stage effects, in addition to the creation of various car journeys.



The characters were sympathetic and believable, the costumes were authentic and both cast and stage fulfilled a variety of roles.

I liked the simple way in which an intolerable American summer heat was portrayed.

As Gatsby’s very foundations started to unravel and he maintained a stoical dignity, it was quite heart-rending to see where the plot was going.

With great musical numbers, swift segues into different moods and its build-up to a tragic ending, this show packed quite a punch.

Review: Natalie Aldred



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