Thursday, 21 September 2017

Red coat appeal

ANYONE can buy a red tailcoat and call themselves a toastmaster, but if you want your master of ceremonies to provide a smooth-running and stress-free day it is recommended that you ask if they are a fellow or member of a guild or association, and then check out that it is genuine.

There are a plethora of guilds and associations who can guide you to the services of their members. There are two important things you need to check. The first is the aforementioned training, the second, and this is very important, is insurance.

Your toastmaster should be covered by at very least £1 million pounds worth of insurance, but ideally in this day and age £5 million pounds worth. As the toastmaster is in your employ, you could be jointly liable for any mistake he or she makes, so always ask about insurance — hence why you may not wish to use a friend or family member! The next thing is, you should never just employ the least expensive. Toastmaster James Hasler recommends that you contact a few and have a proper conversation with each. The most important thing is that they are the right personality for you and your guests and the only way to find this out is by having a decent conversation, preferably face to face or at least, in this age of technology, on Skype.

No event is too small as long as guidance is required. For parties of 40 they can be a great help, with numbers over 80 they are highly recommended and for the likes of Asian weddings where there are regularly guest numbers exceeding 200, they are absolutely essential.

A toastmaster adds a touch of class and sense of occasion to your event, but most importantly they control and co-ordinate everything removing the stress from the wedding party to ensure a great celebration is had by all. “It is unlikely that you will remember what they said, but you will remember how they made you feel.”

More News:

Latest video from

VIDEO: WW2 battles relived at Mapledurham
 

POLL: Have your say