Monday, 27 September 2021

TV pioneer left brain to science

GERRY ANDERSON donated his brain to dementia research shortly before his death.

GERRY ANDERSON donated his brain to dementia research shortly before his death.

The Thunderbirds creator, who lived in Nuffield, died on Boxing Day, aged 83, just over a year after he was diagnosed Alzheimer’s.

He made the decision after discussing the idea with his wife Mary and son Jamie.

The family then contacted the Alzheimer’s Society and learnt about a project called Brains for Dementia Research.

Since 2008, about 1,800 people have signed up as donors and researchers are particularly keen to recruit people over the age of 80. Healthy brains are also needed.

Due to a lack of available human tissue, current medication is based on human brain research carried out in the Seventies.

Jamie, 27, said his father had become gradually more aware that the drug he was taking, Aricept, was having no impact. He told the Daily Telegraph: “After a fund-raising walk, he said, ‘This Alzheimer’s business, it is really terrible, isn’t it? He kept saying it over and over again and I had to agree with him. Then he said, ‘The quicker they can find a cure the better, so they are welcome to my brain’.”

Mr Anderson was diagnosed with the disease in 2010 after his family begun to notice small changes.

In June, he said that he had been “robbed” of his freedom. “Since I’ve had Alzheimer’s I’ve realised how debilitating it is,” he said. “It can affect your life in so many ways that you don’t think about.”

Hundreds of people attended the funeral of the TV pioneer at Henley Road crematorium in Caversham earlier this month.

For more information, visit www.brainsfordementiaresearch.org.uk

Due to a lack of available human tissue, current medication is based on human brain research carried out in the Seventies.

Jamie, 27, said his father had become gradually more aware that the drug he was taking, Aricept, was having no impact. He told the Daily Telegraph: “After a fund-raising walk, he said, ‘This Alzheimer’s business, it is really terrible, isn’t it? He kept saying it over and over again and I had to agree with him. Then he said, ‘The quicker they can find a cure the better, so they are welcome to my brain’.”

Mr Anderson was diagnosed with the disease in 2010 after his family begun to notice small changes.

In June, he said that he had been “robbed” of his freedom. “Since I’ve had Alzheimer’s I’ve realised how debilitating it is,” he said. “It can affect your life in so many ways that you don’t think about.”

Hundreds of people attended the funeral of the TV pioneer at Henley Road crematorium in Caversham earlier this month.

For more information, visit www.brainsfor dementiaresearch.org.uk

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