Saturday, 17 November 2018

Cricketer’s tale hits you for six

Cricketer’s tale hits you for six

Chris Lewis
Kenton Theatre

CHRIS LEWIS was a highly successful British cricketer for many years before his life changed dramatically. He had a remarkable career playing in 32 tests matches and 53 one-day internationals, he scored 100 in India and three times he took five wickets.

In conversation with Gary Newbon he talks about his cricketing career alongside his life choices. At a very low point he agreed to smuggle drugs into England and was caught with the cocaine on the way in. This sent him on a detour to prison and the start of his redemptive story.

In a highly engaging and honest talk, Lewis reflected on his life leading up to that point.

As a child in Guyana, South America he dreamt of one day playing cricket professionally. Back then everyone listened to commentary on the radio and he would follow the activities of Caribbean heroes Gordon Greenidge and Viv Richards. Decades later he had to pinch himself when he stood bowling to Gordon Greenidge.

Having moved to the UK to join his mother at the age of 10, Lewis continued with his love of cricket. His enthusiasm was such that he played before school, at break times, during lunch times and after school.

One of his teachers, noticing how keen and how talented he was, would unlock the gym for him and a couple friends to practice whenever possible. This teacher was instrumental in helping him to get his first team.

He shared fond memories of two teachers, Mr Williams and Mr Evans, for giving him much needed encouragement and opportunity.

Whilst Lewis was happy playing professional cricket, his teammates often saw him as a little aloof and it was interesting when he spoke about this.

Back then the only social activity was around drinking and this was not Lewis’s thing. Plus, he felt that after a 12-hour day practising with his team, he should be able to leave and follow his own leisure pursuits. He was more into dancing.

In 2018 we could have a conversation about cultural differences, but this concept wasn’t spoken of back then. It meant that he became a bit of an outsider with his peers and when he was down on his luck there were few people to call on.

Retirement was followed by Twenty20 cricket but then he got injured. His contract was such that if he didn’t play he didn’t get paid, so his resources began to dwindle. By the time he desperately agreed to commit the crime he says he could barely afford to get to practice. He had no money. This was such an overwhelming time for him that he found it difficult to think clearly.

But Lewis is not angry or depressed about any of it. He turned a dream to play international cricket into a reality and got to play alongside and opposite some of his heroes. He takes full responsibility for what he did and accepts the consequences.

He was released on good behaviour after serving half of his 13-year sentence and his book, Crazy: My Road to Redemption, tells the full story.

He now enjoys everything about having his liberty back. As well as overseeing his book he is putting together a play of his life which will be going on tour in the coming months.

It’s a remarkable journey and he is generous in sharing his story with us. As an audience member I felt I encountered the real Chris Lewis and no doubt that would come through in the book too.

Shirley Anstis

More News:

Latest video from

VIDEO: Tributes paid after rugby player's death
 

POLL: Have your say