Sunday, 18 November 2018

Thames gives up its secrets at museum

AN ancient Egyptian scarab amulet, a Smith and Wesson revolver and an English Civil War breastplate all ended up in

AN ancient Egyptian scarab amulet, a Smith and Wesson revolver and an English Civil War breastplate all ended up in the Thames and have now found their way into the latest exhibition at Reading Museum.

Thames Stories: Art and Archaeology has recently opened at the Sir John Madejski Gallery and will run until October 4.

Objects and pictures from the collections at the museum reveal stories about the people whose lives revolved around the river.

But there are mysteries, too. Some of these people even ended up in the river, and their skulls on display continue to ask us why.

Treasures include 40 Bronze Age swords, axeheads and spearheads, a group of forged medieval pilgrim badges, and more than 100 paintings, drawing and prints from the 1750s to the 1990s.



Until about 1980, objects dredged from the non–tidal Thames by Thames Conservancy and its successors were deposited at Reading and the museum has looked after them ever since.

In the coming months there will be talks, a river–related jewellery–making workshop and a practical study day introducing archaeological ceramics.

This is suitable for all and will include a rare chance to handle real, historic pottery and to try your hand at the sort of clay work used.



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